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Antoine Shahin

Education

  • Ph.D., Medical Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario Canada, 2003
  • M.S., Physics, California State University, Northridge, 1998 (cum laude)
  • B.S., Physics, California State University, Northridge, 1996 (cum laude)

About

Tony Shahin is a researcher specializing in the neurophysiology of auditory perception and development.

Research Focus

Professor Shahin is interested in understanding the neural bases of language perception and cognition. He uses EEG, MEG and fMRI to elucidate the neurophysiological mechanisms fundamental to auditory perception. His current and long term interests are to understand:

1) the neural mechanisms of audiovisual integration during spoken language processing in adverse listening situations and in listeners with hearing loss. Visual information provided by mouth movement can be especially helpful in cluttered acoustical situations (e.g., at a cocktail party). Understanding how the brain combines visual cues with the acoustic signal to produce intelligible percepts has implications for understanding hearing loss and multisensory deficits.

2) The neurophysiological development to processing acoustic and contextual cues in spoken language. Children and adults use different perceptual strategies to make sense of speech, i.e., use speech cues differently. Understanding the development of these strategies, identifying sensitive periods in brain development, can help recognize neural aberrations associated with early (children) language deficits.

Selected Publications

Bhat, J., Miller, L. M., Pitt, M. A., & Shahin, A. J.. (2015). Putative mechanisms mediating tolerance for audiovisual stimulus onset asynchrony. Journal of neurophysiology, 113(5), 1437–1450.

Moberly, A. C., Bhat, J., Welling, D. B., & Shahin, A. J. (2014). Neurophysiology of spectrotemporal cue organization of spoken language in auditory memory. Brain and language, 130, 42–49

Bhat, J., Pitt, M. A., & Shahin, A. J. (2014). Visual context due to speech-reading suppresses the auditory response to acoustic interruptions in speech. Frontiers in neuroscience, 8.

Carpenter, A. L., & Shahin, A. J. (2013). Development of the N1–P2 auditory evoked response to amplitude rise time and rate of formant transition of speech sounds. Neuroscience Letters, 544, 56–61.

Shahin, A. J., Kerlin, J. R., Bhat, J., & Miller, L.M. (2012). Neural restoration of degraded audiovisual speech. Neuroimage, 60, 530–538.

Awards

R01/NIH/NIDCD grant (Antoine Shahin, PI, $1,935,000 total) for "Audiovisual integration for spoken language in adverse listening situations" (3rd percentile), December 2014–November 2019

R03/NIH/NIDCD grant (Antoine Shahin, PI, $448,500 total) "Development of electrophysiological auditory response to speech," July 2010–June 2014